The velied image of Sais – Schiller 1795

Perhaps there has never been a more sublime utterance, or a thoughtmore sublimely expressed, than the well-known inscription upon the Temple of Isis: `I am all that is, and that was, and that shall be, and no mortal hath raised the veil from before my face’.

So said, he seized the cover of the veil.
Well', you will ask,what was it that he saw?’
I cannot tell; unconscious, pale and wan
The temple priests discovered him next morning
Prostrate before the pedestal of Isis.
Whatever there he saw and there experienced
Did never pass his lips, for evermore
All cheerfulness had vanished from his life.
A searing grief soon brought him to his grave.

O woe to him who comes to Truth through guilt,
For it will never, never, bring him joy.

God is Dead

“God is dead, but given the way of men, there may still be caves for thousands of years in which his shadow will be shown. And we – we still have to vanquish his shadow, too.”

From Nietzsche’s 1882 “The Joyful Pursuit of Knowledge and Understanding” (The Gay Science).

Photo by Jonathan Bowers

Calling innovative film directors and producers, a cutting edge script awaits you …

THE FUGITIVE STAG – AN EPIC TALE READY FOR YOU …

Productions are coming back! After a long hiatus the plans to  begin production are starting to come into focus.

That is great news!

But something else lurks on the horizon… 

The WGA and the major agencies
  are still at odds with no end in sight.The smart writers see this as an opportunity to take their work directly  to producers and managers rather than trying to land agents.  

Across the industry, from the UK to the US, producers are looking for the most cutting edge scripts

News from Stage 32 and the world of film-making

Productions are coming back! After a long hiatus the plans to  begin production are starting to come into focus.

That is great news!

But something else lurks on the horizon… 

The WGA and the major agencies
 are still at odds with no end in sight.The smart writers see this as an opportunity to take their work directly  to producers and managers rather than trying to land agents.  

Across the industry, from the UK to the US, producers are looking for the most cutting edge scripts

CALLING ALL DIRECTORS AND PRODUCERS AS WELL AS ACTORS WITH INFLUENCE …

By the way W.G.A. stands for

Writers Guild of America (WGA) writing credit system for motion pictures and television programs covers all works under the jurisdiction of the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and the Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW).

A labour union composed of the thousands of writers who write the content for television shows, movies, news programs, documentaries, animation, and Internet and even mobile phones.

Canto LXXXI

What thou lovest well remains,
                                                  the rest is dross
What thou lov’st well shall not be reft from thee
What thou lov’st well is thy true heritage …

 To have gathered from the air a live tradition
or from a fine old eye the unconquered flame
This is not vanity.
         Here error is all in the not done,
all in the diffidence that faltered  .  .
  .

Ezra Pound

Ann ap is blessed …

Ann ap (nee Dowdeswell)

She can read many of my favourite poets in their original language.

WERNER HERZOG – Xan Brooks writes: Does he read in English or German? “Ha,” he says, as though I have fallen into his trap. “I read in other languages, too. I read in Spanish and I read in Latin and I read in ancient Greek and I read in, er, whatever. But it doesn’t matter. It depends on the text.

I mean, take, for instance, Hölderlin, the greatest of the German poets. You cannot touch him in translation. If you’re reading Hölderlin, you must learn German first.”

The divine Holderlin! At least I enjoy the excellent translations of Michael Hamburger. He worked on Holderlin for 60 years and for his 80th birthday put out an 800 page parallel text 4th edition. My ‘Holderlin Bible.’

Michael Hamburger OBE – 22 March 1924 – 7 June 2007




Werner Herzog, working hard and enjoying it at 77

Herzog’s early years read like a Bildungsroman, like something he had immortalised in one of his own films. Born in Nazi Germany in 1942, he was raised in splendid seclusion, in a Bavarian mountain village. He saw his first movie at 11, made his first telephone call at 17 and had founded his first production company before his 20th birthday, using a camera he had stolen from the Munich film school. His career and current status is a triumph of self-actualisation. And possibly self-mythologising, too, because the man is a canny circus barker, keen to ensure that we print the legend

His tales may be salted, but they are, by and large, true, just as the films themselves stir documentary realism in with wanton, stylised fabrication to the point where the usual genre labels no longer apply. In terms of subject matter, he has always been drawn to wild corners and dark pockets, be it the Chauvet caves of southern France, bear-infested west Alaska or the fevered psyches of his fictional anti-heroes. Every production is a quest. Every film is a quarry – something to be pursued with bows and arrows, or coaxed out of the forest and invited to eat from your hand. Herzog’s finest work (the ethnographic documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams, say, or The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, his tale of a 19th-century German foundling) touches on the sublime. But even his misfires and experiments are never without interest.

It’s very strange, but I have never been my actual age. For a start, I grew up later than my peers. Physically, you know – my puberty was late. Then at age 19 I started making films, which is work you don’t normally do until you’re 35. All the years when you learn your craft, become an apprentice, train to become a clockmaker or doctor – I jumped them. And it’s odd because it means that I have never lived my proper age. That’s why I don’t have much contact with my peers.”

From an article by – At 77 and holed up in lock-down, the veteran director and latter day actor shows no signs of slowing down or accepting any limitations – by Xan Brooks